China

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This New Data Should Make You Pretty Nervous About The Latest Bird Flu

Lily Kuo | The Atlantic Cities | April 25, 2013

Only 4 of the 81 people with confirmed cases of bird flu in China have fully recovered, according to a new study of the outbreak by the New England Journal of Medicine. The report also confirms that human-to-human transmission of H7N9, which could cause a deadly global pandemic, can’t be ruled out. Here’s a summary of the report. Read More »

Tips for Non-Native English Speakers Working on Open Source Projects

The primary language of most open source projects is English, but open source users and contributors span the globe. Non-native speakers face many communication and cultural challenges when participating in the ecosystem. In this article, we will share challenges, how to overcome them, and best practices for easing onboarding of non-native speakers, as non-native English speakers and contributors to OpenStack. We are based in Japan, Brazil, and China, and work daily with the huge OpenStack community that is spread around the world. The official language of OpenStack is English, which means we communicate daily as non-native speakers...

U.S. Health Reform Expert Shares Experiences

Staff Writer | People's Daily Online | February 25, 2012

World-renowned leader in health care philosophy, Dr. Kenneth W. Kizer, advocated expanding health care in communities and adopting telemedicine approaches as China works to reform its publicly-funded hospital system. Read More »

Using Open Technology To Build a Biodefense Against the Coronavirus

As the number of US cases of the coronavirus rises, how will healthcare professionals be able to tell the difference between which panicked patients with similar symptoms has what? Even if the patient hasn't traveled to Wuhan or China recently, what if they sat at a Starbucks with someone who did? With the incubation time-lag before symptoms appear, who would even know? The challenge of monitoring 330 million people for infectious disease outbreaks is daunting. Take the flu as an example. During the last flu season which, as already discussed, was not as complex as this year's season, approximately 35.5 million Americans had flu symptoms, 16.5 million received medical care, 490,600 were hospitalized and 34,200 died.

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VA Networks Besieged By Foreign Attackers, IG Says

Nicole Blake Johnson | Federal Times | June 4, 2013

Foreign attackers have repeatedly penetrated Veterans Affairs Department networks for at least the past three years, potentially gaining access to millions of unencrypted veterans records and other sensitive databases, according to House lawmakers and VA inspector general auditors. Read More »

Waste from Pharmaceutical Plants in India and China Promotes Antibiotic-Resistant Superbugs

Henry A. Waxman and Bill Corr | STAT | October 14, 2016

Superbugs, disease-causing microbes that have mutated to become resistant to antibiotics, are a threat to the lives of hundreds of thousands of people today and many millions tomorrow. These organisms turn curable illnesses such as tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and pneumococcal pneumonia into deadly ones. This looming public health disaster has many causes. Overuse of antibiotics by humans and the routine use of antibiotics to help farm animals grow faster are key causes in the United States. One worrisome cause that has received virtually no attention until now is wastewater from drug manufacturing facilities in India and China, where a large portion of the world’s antibiotic supply is produced...

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We’re Not No. 1! We’re Not No. 1!

Nicholas Kristof | The New York Times | April 2, 2014

...a major new ranking of livability in 132 countries puts the United States in a sobering 16th place. We underperform because our economic and military strengths don’t translate into well-being for the average citizen. In the Social Progress Index, the United States excels in access to advanced education but ranks 70th in health, 69th in ecosystem sustainability, 39th in basic education, 34th in access to water and sanitation and 31st in personal safety...

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What We Don't Know About The Deadly New SARS-Like Virus

Alexander Abad-Santos | Atlantic Wire | May 2, 2013

Saudi Arabia announced late Wednesday that five more people have died and two others are undergoing intensive treatment as a result of the new novel coronavirus (NCoV), a cousin of SARS that causes kidney failure and pneumonia. The latest in a slow trickle of information brings the mortality rate to 16 deaths among 24 known infections [...]. Read More »

Why an MRI Costs $1,080 in America and $280 in France

Ezra Klein | The Washington Post | March 3, 2012

There is a simple reason health care in the United States costs more than it does anywhere else: The prices are higher.

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Why China Is Beating the U.S. at Innovation

Paul Davidson | USA Today | April 17, 2017

For decades, America lost factories and jobs to China but retained a coveted title: the world's leader in inventing and commercializing new products. Now, even that status has been eroded, and it's hurting the economy. While the United States is still at the top in total investment in research and development — spending $500 billion in 2015 —  a new Boston Consulting Group (BCG) study released Monday has made a startling finding: A couple of years ago, China quietly surpassed the U.S. in spending on the later stage of R&D that turns discoveries into commercial products. And at its current rate of spending, China will invest up to  twice as much as the U.S., or $658 billion, by 2018 on this critical late-stage research...

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Why The Smart Grid Might Be A Dumb Idea

Coral Davenport | Nextgov | July 15, 2013

Foreign hackers don't just pose a threat to classified material, corporate secrets, and individual pri­vacy. Security experts say the greatest cyberthreat to the United States is the fact that the Chinese and Russian governments—and possibly other players—have succeeded in hacking into the nation's electric grid, giving them the ability, if they wish, to bring the U.S. economy to a screeching halt with the click of a mouse. Read More »

You Won't Believe the Outrageous Ways Big Pharma Has Bribed Doctors to Shill Drugs

Martha Rosenberg | The Influence | July 18, 2016

At the 2010 meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in New Orleans, a psychiatrist from the East coast shared her anger with me about the recent clamp down on Pharma financial perks to doctors. Before news organizations and the 2010 Physician Financial Transparency Reports (also called the Sunshine Act, part of the Affordable Care Act) reported the outrageous amount of money Pharma was giving doctors to prescribe its new, brand-name drugs, there was almost no limit to what was spent to encourage prescribing...

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